Download A Companion to David Lewis (Blackwell Companions to by Barry Loewer, Jonathan Schaffer PDF

By Barry Loewer, Jonathan Schaffer

In A better half to David Lewis, Barry Loewer and Jonathan Schaffer compile best philosophers to give an explanation for, speak about, and seriously expand Lewis’s seminal paintings in unique methods. scholars and students will notice the underlying subject matters and intricate interconnections woven throughout the varied diversity of his paintings in metaphysics, philosophy of language, good judgment, epistemology, philosophy of technological know-how, philosophy of brain, ethics, and aesthetics.
The first and in basic terms entire learn of the paintings of David Lewis, the most systematic and influential philosophers of the latter half the 20 th century
Contributions make clear the underlying issues and intricate interconnections woven via Lewis’s paintings throughout his huge, immense variety of impact, together with metaphysics, language, good judgment, epistemology, technological know-how, brain, ethics, and aesthetics
Outstanding Lewis students and major philosophers operating within the fields Lewis encouraged clarify, speak about, and seriously expand Lewis’s paintings in unique ways
An crucial source for college kids and researchers throughout analytic philosophy that covers the foremost issues of Lewis’s paintings

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A Companion to David Lewis (Blackwell Companions to Philosophy)

In A significant other to David Lewis, Barry Loewer and Jonathan Schaffer assemble most sensible philosophers to provide an explanation for, talk about, and significantly expand Lewis’s seminal paintings in unique methods. scholars and students will detect the underlying issues and complicated interconnections woven during the assorted variety of his paintings in metaphysics, philosophy of language, common sense, epistemology, philosophy of technology, philosophy of brain, ethics, and aesthetics.

Additional resources for A Companion to David Lewis (Blackwell Companions to Philosophy)

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Part of this conservatism is a reluctance to accept theories that fly in the face of common sense. But it’s a matter of balance and judgement. (Lewis 1986b, 134) Despite the reference to common sense, the “only sensible policy” here seems to be to not lightly tamper with one’s starting point: to be modest about what could be accomplished after a fresh start. Lewis never explicitly discusses what one ought to do if one were to come to believe that one’s own starting beliefs were idiosyncratic and not “common sense,” but theoretical conservatism would likely take as dim a view of a wholesale revision to match the beliefs of others as any other wholesale revision.

Perhaps the trouble is rather this. ” Suppose, let us say, that there are countably many independent respects of similarity that each contribute to similarity with a weight of +1; and countably many respects of dissimilarity that each contribute with a weight of -1. The case confronts us with an insoluble problem in infinite arithmetic. Fair enough; I suppose such cases might arise, and might contribute to the indeterminacy and arbitrariness of comparative similarity. Especially so, perhaps, when we look at far-fetched possibilities, comparing two rival counterparts both very different from the original in very different directions; and, sure enough, questions about especially far-fetched possibilities do seem especially indeterminate and arbitrary.

If every difference between worlds was reflected in a difference between their representatives, and if no worlds were unrepresented, then the worlds would correspond one-to-one with their representatives, which means that the worlds would themselves form a set. Now I don’t suppose, and neither does Quine, that his system of representation is complete in either of the required ways. But there’s enormous room for generalizing and enriching the system, and I do find it plausible as a working hypothesis that some or other improved version would do the trick.

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